Three weeks ago, I decided to do something out of my comfort zone. I signed up for a CrossFit Competition. I know it probably doesn’t seem that crazy, but it felt like a huge step. You see, I wanted to use it as a starting point.

Wait? What is CrossFit? I’ve put together 8 Moves You Need To Know Before Starting CrossFit, and they’re available for FREE!

I’ve been doing CrossFit (again) for about 15 months. I started back (after a good two-year break) when we moved to Florida and prioritized my health and fitness. I found a wonderful gym that had convenient class times, was close to home, and welcomed me for as long as I was going to be around.

I saw so much progress physically while I was there that I often forget about the boost attending CrossFit classes regularly gave my mental health. I loved that when I walked in the gym, I was Rebecca. I wasn’t mom. I wasn’t an army wife. I wasn’t a writer. I was just me. I worked hard, I had fun, and then I went home.

It was perfect, and it was exactly what I needed. And then we moved.

It took me about a month to find my next CrossFit home, and I’ve been there about six months. While they still give me the mental break I need, I’ve been focusing more on my physical progress. I’m in a place now where I’m able to eat well and sleep well, so I decided it was time to kick up my workout game.

And the opportunity presented itself with the WZA Online Challenge and Qualifier. With this competition, I was able to do the workouts at my home gym, within the window allotted, and see where I stacked up. I entered the Intermediate/Scaled division which is appropriately described like this:

This division is for the “weekend warrior” or aspiring competitor.

Those looking to compete at WZA Miami in the Intermediate division need to be able to lift moderate loads, complete most gymnastic movements, and be able to perform most workouts “Rx’d.”

I figured this would be a good challenge, where I could compete at the intermediate level and, if needed, drop down to the scaled version. There were seven workouts, but two of them I missed due to illness. Of course, those were the two I would have done the best in because they were the purely weight lifting ones! But oh well, this was about learning where I stood overall, and how I needed to improve.

Here’s how I did:

  • 998 women completed enough workouts to be ranked.
  • My scores put me at #798.
  • My lowest scoring workout was the first one, and my highest scoring was the 8 minute, max meters row – where I fell squarely in the middle.

Here’s what I learned:

  • I need to learn how to push myself more – I tend to pace myself and have effort left when it’s all over.
  • I need to work on my gymnastics skills.
  • Weightlifting wise, I could compete at the intermediate level.
  • Next year the competition will be much harder!

Here’s what I’m doing about it:

  • I will register again next year!
  • I will also look for some local competitions where I can continue to measure improvement.
  • I have committed to three days a week at the gym, with extra work on pull-ups.

Why is this important? I mean, I basically came in last.

It’s important because it shows two things.

  1. I had the courage to show up.
  2. I have the drive to keep going.

Want to follow me on this journey? Well, you’re in a great place to do just that. I’ll be sharing ups and downs along the way on the blog and on Instagram. I’ll also be sharing the “behind the scenes” look at what prioritizing myself, and my fitness looks like.

Interested in working out with me? If you’re local, I encourage you to join me at my gym. If you’re not, but you want to start working out, let’s talk about how you can do this from the safety of your own home with GFit30. You have 30 minutes to work out three times a week, I guarantee it.

What are your goals for the rest of this year? For next year? Let me know in the comments so I can support you.

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